Carousel of Light comes home

Lance Shinkle's nautical masterpiece returns to Falmouth
Falmouth artist and Carousel of Light creator Lance Shinkle greeted a 28-foot trailer loaded with hand-carved horses and chariots at his workshop on Friday afternoon. The carousel committee is searching for a location to set up and run the "art in motion"

Earlier this month, a special piece of Falmouth returned home after five years.  The one-of-a-kind handmade carousel designed and built by Lance Shinkle more than two decades ago is returning to the Upper Cape after a brief stay on the West Coast.

Shinkle, a long-time Falmouth resident, built the nautical-themed carousel here and moved it to California in 2008 while he cared for his ailing father.  After the death of his father in 2009, Shinkle decided to bring his Carousel of Light back home and donate it to the community.

The moving masterpiece has been donated to the Carousel of Light Inc. The goal of the non-profit is to find a suitable, permanent home for the carousel, then maintain and operate it for the enjoyment of the community. CoL will also raise money to support other Falmouth community charities.

The carousel operates with a 1947 Allan Herschell mechanism, similar to that used in the carousel at the National Mall in DC.

Shinkle's carousel has twenty horses, two wheelchair-accessible chariots, three sculptures and twelve panels. According to CoL, Shinkle's is the only hand-carved carousel created on the Cape.

The horses and chariots were carved from eastern white pine from the Cataumet Sawmill in Falmouth.

“Where others tend to go round and round in pursuit of purpose, the Carousel of Light Inc. is focused and headed in the right direction – bringing Lance Shinkle’s hand-carved carousel back to Falmouth,” said Jay Zavala, president and CEO of the Falmouth Chamber of Commerce. “They don’t need talent and they don’t need luck, they only need our collective help.”

Fund raising events will be held in an effort to have the carousel fully operational for Memorial Day Weekend.


Called "art in motion", the carousel has a realistic fluidity. Photo courtesy of CoL.


A nautical theme--complete with sea horses, mermaids and fishing nets--adorns the carousel. Photo courtesy of CoL.


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