Buckley's blog

Surgeon at Sword Point?

  The Gumshoe Historians conclude their CABO VERDE series on the "Isle of Quails"

 

 

THIS is why Hit and Run History forged Captain John Kendrick's sword in the first place.

Wrapping up their Cape Verde series, the Gumshoe Historians head to the capital of Praia. Here the Columbia Expedition arrived in November of 1787, and spent over a month lurching from crisis to crisis.

HRH heads to the desolate Isle of Quails, where Kendrick fired his First Officer Simeon Woodruff for incompetence soon after arrival. A few weeks later, the Commander chased down Doctor Roberts, his ship's surgeon in the streets of Praia.

Not even out of the North Atlantic and men fleeing like rats. Time get out while we still can.

Interviews: Joshua M. Smith, PhD, James J. Lopes, Esq. Locations: Praia, Cape Verde

This program is funded in part by Mass Humanities, which receives support from the Massachusetts Cultural Council and is an affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Hit and Run History in Cape Verde

© Thunderball Entertainment Group 2013. Hit and Run History™ and the Columbia Expedition™ are trademarks of Thunderball Entertainment Group.

Watch this episode, "Praia", by subscribing to their FREE video podcast on iTunes. Just search “Hit and Run History”. Or watch online at YouTube, Vimeo or Blip. Follow Hit and Run History as they follow the story of the Columbia Expedition and John Kendrick around the world at www.hitandrunhistory.com.

The Dengue & the Volcano

Gripped with Dengue Fever, Cape Verde gets help from the Gumshoe Historians

 

 

Saving lives, driving up volcanos and drinking wine. For this, Hit and Run History came to Fogo.

We thought our story lay only on Maio and Santiago. But Fogo -- a cone rising from the ocean -- is in the grips of dengue, its hospital overwhelmed and HRH brings in simple medical supplies.

Yet again we find connections back to Columbia and John Kendrick in a village at the base of the volcano. Coastal places and peoples stand connected, an ocean apart. And the wine flowed...

Interviews: Dr. Mario Sena, Hon. João Aqueleu Barbosa Amado

Locations: Hospital of São Filipe, Chã das Caldeiras and Santa Catarina

This program is funded in part by Mass Humanities, which receives support from the Massachusetts Cultural Council and is an affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

© Thunderball Entertainment Group 2013. Hit and Run History™ and the Columbia Expedition™ are trademarks of Thunderball Entertainment Group.

Watch this episode, "Fogo", by subscribing to their FREE video podcast on iTunes. Just search “Hit and Run History”. Or watch online at YouTube, Vimeo or Blip. Follow Hit and Run History as they follow the story of the Columbia Expedition and John Kendrick around the world at www.hitandrunhistory.com.

Cape Cod To Cape Verde

The Isle of May welcomes the Gumshoe Historians

 

 

Cast off!

Cape Cod's Gumshoe Historians are off at last, crossing the Atlantic. Next stop, the African archipelago of Cape Verde. The Columbia Expedition stopped here in November 1787, anchoring at the tiny island of Isle of May (Maio) at Porto Ingles.

The village on "English Roads" is a former slave entrepôt still bears the marks of human trafficking from centuries ago. So why did Captain Kendrick choose this barren little island to bring Columbia and Washington to? And why stay here for a week when the capital of the islands, Praia, lay just across the channel?

Hit and Run History finds some answers. And a ton of sunshine, sandy beaches and a friendly faces.

Locations: Logan Airport, Boston; Praia and Port Ingles, Maio, Cape Verde.

Interviews: Joshua M. Smith, Alan McClennen, Jr.

This program is funded in part by Mass Humanities, which receives support from the Massachusetts Cultural Council and is an affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

© Thunderball Entertainment Group 2013. Hit and Run History™ and the Columbia Expedition™ are trademarks of Thunderball Entertainment Group.

Watch this episode, Maio, by subscribing to their FREE video podcast on iTunes. Just search “Hit and Run History”. Or watch online at YouTube, Vimeo our Blip.

Man Overboard

Cape Cod's Intrepid Gumshoe Historians laugh in the face of death

 

Captain Kendrick's sword is DONE. So Andrew Buckley and his Gumshoe Historians better test it out.

But as they prepare to follow the Columbia Expedition across the ocean, plans begin to unravel. Could they have gotten the wrong man in New York? Then they lose their Portuguese translator.

And news of an epidemic in Cape Verde.

This is turning out to be much more than a history show. This is an adventure.

Locations: Chatham, Sturgis Library - Barnstable, Quincy, Cape Cod Community Media Center

This program is funded in part by Mass Humanities, which receives support from the Massachusetts Cultural Council and is an affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

© Thunderball Entertainment Group 2013. Hit and Run History™ and the Columbia Expedition™ are trademarks of Thunderball Entertainment Group.

Watch this episode, Man Overboard, by subscribing to their FREE video podcast on iTunes. Just search “Hit and Run History”. Or watch online at on YouTube, Vimeo our Blip.
 

The Sixth Man

Cape Cod's Gumshoe forge sword, hit the streets of the Big Apple

 

 

Road trip! Swords, food and tales of old!

As Chatham metalsmith Rusty Griffin puts the final polish on Captain Kendrick's sword, Andrew Buckley and his crew of Gumshoe Historians are off to the streets of New York City. After meeting up with an old friend, maritime historian Dr. Joshua Smith, at Lansky's Deli for lunch, they walk the Upper West Side, getting background on how things should have been running aboard the vessels of the Columbia Expedition.

Then a block up the street at the New-York Historical Society, our boys check out the founder, John Pintard, and reputed a backer of the first American voyage around the world. Reputed.

Locations: Chatham, Massachusetts, New York City

Interview: Joshua M. Smith, PhD

This program is funded in part by Mass Humanities, which receives support from the Massachusetts Cultural Council and is an affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

© Thunderball Entertainment Group 2013. Hit and Run History™ and the Columbia Expedition™ are trademarks of Thunderball Entertainment Group.

Watch this episode, The Sixth Man, by subscribing to our FREE video podcast on iTunes. Just search “Hit and Run History”. Or watch online at on YouTube, Vimeo our Blip.

The Quest for Kendrick's Sword

First episode of HRH's CABO VERDE series features ancient steel and heavy metal

The blade's the thing. In command of the Columbia Expedition on its way from Boston to Cape Verde, Captain John Kendrick's authority was represented by his sword. Gumshoe Historians Andrew Buckley and Matt Griffin are readying to follow Kendrick and Columbia on its round the world voyage. What better way to prep than to commission the forging of the captain's cutlass?

Locations: Charlestown, Boston, and Chatham, Massachusetts. Interviews: Harrie Slootbeek, Matthew Brenckle, Peter Drummey

18th century swords on Hit and Run HistoryHit and Run History is on the trail of the Columbia Expedition -- the first American voyage 'round the world. In their previous season, they followed the genesis of this global trading scheme from its genesis in the parlors of post-Revolutionary War Boston down to the shores of Pleasant Bay, and the boyhood home of John Kendrick, who would command the Expedition.

Columbia's first stop on their journey were the islands of Cape Verde. But before Hit and Run History's modern-day crew follows, they've got a few things to get out of the way. The first of which is the forging of a sword like Captain Kendrick had. Don't ask why for now...

This episode features music by Boston's Shea Rose as well as Sidewalk Driver and German metal band Noise of Minority. 

Open Your Cape Verde Christmas Present Early!

Exclusive Online Showing of Hit and Run History's adventure to Cape Verde this week only

Cape Cod's intrepid Gumshoe Historians have a present for you and they want you to open it right now.

Dreary December Cape Cod weather go you down? Take a break from hectic holiday madness and ride shotgun to history in this adventure to the desert archipelago off the West Coast of the Sahara.

Hit and Run History is on the trail of the Columbia Expedition -- the first American voyage 'round the world. In their previous season, they followed the genesis of this global trading scheme from its genesis in the parlors of post-Revolutionary War Boston down to the shores of Pleasant Bay, and the boyhood home of John Kendrick, who would command the Expedition.

Having shoved off from the wharf, the crew of Columbia makes their way across the Atlantic for the first stop on their three-year voyage: the islands of Cape Verde. Forging swords, climbing volcanos and dodging dengue-ridden mosquitos -- there's plenty of adventure packed into this FREE one-hour viewing.

Available now through Christmas, "this is our way of giving back to our fans," says HRH creator and host Andrew Buckley. "We have so much more to show this coming year, from the Falklands to Cape Horn and Chile. But before we got to that, we knew had to get out two previous episodes."

Re-edited into a five-part online series, the pilot for Hit and Run History: The Columbia Expedition premiered on local television and across the web. "When I realized my mother had bought a smart TV and could watch us on our channels on Vimeo, YouTube or Blip, it was obvious where we needed to be," says Buckley. "Everywhere. First our pilot and now, for a limited time around Christmas, our Cape Verde adventure."

Featuring music by Boston's Shea Rose as well as Sidewalk Driver and young Cape Verdean guitar phenom Noah Andrade, this second chapter hits Boston, Cape Cod, New York and the islands of Maio, Fogo and Santiago.

Once the run online concludes for that episode, HRH plans to release selected shorts online. But they will save the whole episode for release in full HD for sale in the first half of 2013. Then HRH will continue with release of their Falklands and Cape Horn series. Buckley is likes the timing coinciding with the most auspicious part of Columbia's journey.

"Just in time for the 225th anniversary of the arrival of the first American ships on the West Coast," observes Buckley.

Act Like Parents

“My kids know about it, but they seem to be OK.”

Overheard at the ice rink in Orleans. Outside the sparsest of snowflakes were changing into a light drizzle, turning what had been a somewhat mild December Sunday into fullbore clammy. Inside the rink at least it was dry. Drier. The snack bar is the only refuge for parents and kids seeking to warm up.

Amidst the French fries and the hot cocoa, talk of the school killings in Newtown drifted through the air. Their kids had returned home from school on Friday before the news hit, and now parents would be sending their kids back tomorrow with this unavoidable topic facing them at the school door.

While there have been several more – what else can we call them – massacres like this over the past decade, the one that really stands out as a turning point is Columbine. That was high school. Although unforgivable, the idea of twisted revenge for bullying is not too difficult to understand.

But what happened at Sandy Hook is of a different order because it was an elementary school. There is no way we can wrap our heads around this enough to give any sort of rational answer to the question: Why?

The debates encountered in the national media and amongst ourselves in social media seem to be quickly falling into two camps. It is about guns. It is about mental health care.

To the latter I will attach the argument that it is about God, or absence thereof from schools, or lack of morality in today’s society or too many single mothers raising loner sons.

My first thought was that we have made a mistake in relocating our police station in Chatham from what was a mere feet from our elementary school to a couple miles away. We can be relieved that the fire and rescue personnel are still adjacent, but their mission is different.

If there is any validity to the argument that if only someone at the school had a gun, the gunman wouldn’t have gotten as far as he did, then what about a whole building of cops right next door? If there is any validity in the idea of deterrence, that people who rampage wantonly tend to target those least likely to defend themselves, then we ought to be siting our schools next to our police stations. For some reason, it once seemed like the right idea.

As for God not being there because he wasn’t allowed due to laws against school prayer, I must answer that with all due respect, when innocent children are dying, the God you worship follows the laws of men? To quote The Hulk in the movie “The Avengers”: “Puny God.”

If that’s your religion, I definitely don’t want my child learning it. Perhaps you have them mixed up. Sounds more like the cruelty of the other guy.

But that doesn’t get to the reason. We seem to want an answer. Is it guns? Is it lack of mental health? As if it couldn’t be both.

As if when a person gets into a car accident, it has to be that they had one drink. Not that their tires were bald, or they were speeding, or they were talking on the phone, or they were over 80, or the meeting ran late and was dark, or a deer ran out of the woods, or the roads were icy and the roads hadn’t been sanded, or… Can you see that scenario? Can you see yourself in it? Then please answer the question: Why did you hit that tree? What one reason caused it?

I do not believe that easy access to guns alone caused this. Guns are on the streets of all our major cities, where there are plenty of defenseless people. Yet we do not have mass shootings every day.

I do not believe mental health counseling alone would have helped prevent this tragedy. Psychiatrists and psychologists and social workers, even the most expert, are not clairvoyant. They are not human seismographs.

What I believe is that this tragedy, and perhaps many of those in the recent past, could have been prevented had these seriously mentally ill people received the kind of health care they needed and not had easy access to weapons that take little physical effort or thinking to inflict mortal harm so quickly.

I hold with the view that the entirety of the Second Amendment is valid. Meaning, that the right to bear arms by the public is only in relation to “a well-regulated militia.” At the moment, the sale of arms across this country ranges from highly regulated private ownership to easy purchase at gun shows with a right to carry it concealed. But nowhere do I see it attached to a duty to the common defense.

With no explicit obligation to that responsibility so clearly and simply stated in the Constitution, it is no wonder the Supreme Court majority of strict constructionists is so hostile to gun control.

If the ownership of a gun meant you were now part of a local government organization with a chain of command and fixed schedules for drills, many rugged individualists would pass. If it meant you could not get a gun or ammunition without being a member, it would cut down on the number of guns. If it meant you only got as many guns as your unit said you needed – not unlike the uniformed services – that would cut down on the number ofguns. If it meant regular physical and psychological screenings, we could keep the guns away from the cowardly and deranged. We might actually find people in need of help.

It would also mean that every single person who owned a gun would have to keep it as safe as any soldier, marine, sailor, airman or Coast Guardsmen who is issued a weapon – locked up and away from anyone who might pose a threat. A toddler. A distraught spouse. A burglar. An unstable family member. If you do not keep it safe, you get court martialed.

One thing to keep in mind, though: It is an amendment, not a commandment. It can be changed if it becomes too impractical.

But a strict observation of the Second Amendment would not be enough. Many of us have read one mother’s plea for help, “I am Adam Lanza’s Mother.” In this blog posting, one mother details the struggles she faces with a mentally ill teen whom she sees as the next possible perpetrator. Our system is not equipped to handle them until they break the law, until it is too late.

But punishment after the crime is not the answer. It cannot be left as our only option. It certainly is not available to the families of the victims of Sandy Hook.

If it means easier institutionalization, then we need to do that better than the nightmares reinforced by “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.” The residential settings for halfway homes that were supposed to materialize in the ’70s and ’80s never worked out. People just didn’t want the recently released living next to them based on founded or unfounded fears. We need to relieve families of the mentally ill of the burden of care, which clearly can be too much to handle – for the good of us all.

These are but two possible means to address the problem. We want answers, but we also want solutions. Pragmatism is the answer. Let’s try some new things. This is how parents behave.


Read this and Andy's other columns online at The Cape Cod Chronicle

 

Winter Weather Warlock

Winter WarlockWith the inevitable slide into colder weather, meaning my surrendering at long last to the wearing of pants and the seasonal retirement to the lower dresser drawer of my shorts, I am wondering about the longrange forecast. What are we going to get? Having dodged the bullet of a real winter last year, we are certainly due.

If not due a hammering, brutally-cold winter with temperatures in the single digits as was ushered in back in December 1999, or the heavy three-foot snowfall of January 2005, then maybe just a, well, normal winter. Have we lost track of what that is like here?

Let’s see if I can recount how it goes… … and I’ll be a little loose on my definition of “winter” here, in that it is any month where a) things are dying, and b) I am not wearing shorts to work outside… First, a bracing Thanksgiving. In that when the family is kicked out of the house while waiting for supper to be served, and we’re supposed to be going for a walk, it will be then that we realize that the jackets we took are better suited for around Halloween evening than the Northwest wind of November that treats our fleece like so much Kleenex, blowing its nose without a care before moving on. We return to the house more cold than hungry, but eager to pack on the calories as nature intended.

In early December, we often get “Chatham-onthe- moors”. TheAtlantic doesn’t like the rush to cool down, and we’re socked in with blinding fogs. Sure, it seems mild enough. You can go out with October’s light jacket again. But if there’s so much as a puff of a breeze, you’re getting saturated. The first of the Cape Cod Crud can be heard taking hold in the backs of throats. Clear it. Cough. Try again. There. Better get back inside and have something warm. But not before you realize you need to check out the wood pile, now in the dark. Search for the flashlight and head out into the night with big, warm coat from the back of the hall closet that someone left during a Christmas party years ago. You might have it on inside out. Stumble around the dew-ridden and muddy yard. Sure enough, all that’s left are a few punky logs.

If we’re lucky, this weather will go away after a few days, only to return on Christmas Day. And there’s just nothing more fun for a kid to look up from a pile of opened presents, and see just beyond the Christmas tree a window with all the joys of a gray Cape Cod Christmas. Sled? Not today, not unless you want to try it on the slick, muddy grass of the back yard. New bike? Sure, there’s a drizzle and the thermometer is hovering just below 40. Go out and catch a cold. Snow shoes? Well, they are pretty handy for climbing over vine-infested honeysuckle bushes, with or without snow. Give it a shot, kid.

OR, for Christmas (give or take 24 hours), we’ll get our first real snow. And that’s just fine. Except that if you didn’t call to get aload of firewood in to replace that pile of rot and mildew in the back yard, you’re going to think that maybe if you get the fireplace heated up enough you might be able to burn it anyway. Which is true, you can. You will also smoke out all the visiting family and friends in the meantime. Nothing like opening all the windows in the house on a 28-degree day, to let out clouds of white smoke. When neighbors call to see if you’re okay, just tell them this was just your way of announcing the election of a new pope.

Followed a week later by New Years Eve. Standing out in the dark in the cold to watch fireworks. Awful, awful. The damp, damp, cold, made hazardous by black ice. Or the bitter, bone-cracking cold. Either way, you’re going back inside with all these other people, coughing and drinking. You’re starting your year off with a cold, at least.

Winter WarlockThen on comes January. Cold with occasional periods of damp and cold. Then cold and snowy. Then one day the sun comes out and the temperature rises to 58 degrees, and it feels like spring, and the snow’s melting just enough by sundown, and then instead now it is icy and cold. Then really cold, and you can’t find that woodpile anyway, and are you telling me we didn’t make ANY plans to go someplace warm in February? Well, can we find something last minute? Okay, you look, I’m going to bed. Yes, I know it’s 9:15.

February, by contrast, is fine. Just fine. Snow and cold. You’re used to it now. Then it snows again, on top of the snow from last week, and that’s not the way it is supposed to be, it’s supposed to snow, then eventually melt in time for the next snow. We’re not supposed to get layers of snow here. And then while everyone gets socked by a major blizzard, we get rain, but that doesn’t matter because whomever is Superintendent of Schools this year had decided that because all the other school systems decided to jump off the Sagamore Bridge, we ought to as well and cancel school 12 hours before we’re hit by anything. Better safe than sorry (the only people sorry about a school day are wage-earning parents who don’t get paid when they have to take time off from work) and no parent ever required a note of a school explaining their absence. But mostly February is fine because three times out of four, it is only 28 days long.

And finally there’s March. The forecast for March is, as always, plenty of all that really crummy, cold, clammy weather mixed together and thrown in rapid succession so as to make sure if you weren’t sick, you will be. That Cape Cod Crud is now deep in your lungs, making you sound like a two-packs-of-unfiltered-Camels indulger. But as luck would have it, there is a cure. It’s called June. Until then, you’re on your own, and I’ll be digging out my shorts.

Read this and Andy's other columns online at The Cape Cod Chronicle

 

Cape Cod Relief to Staten Island

Sofie Buckley helped organize relief supplies to Staten Island, pictured here with donor Jared BickfordQuickly Organized Trip Brings Supplies To New York Storm Victims

What began on Friday morning here in Chatham as an idea to use the fine weather of the weekend and an empty pickup truck to bring whatever was needed in the New York City area and could be quickly gathered became a reality. Within half an hour of raising the idea, I read a post on Facebook by my high school classmate Lucy Burton. Lucy and her husband, David, of Mashpee were collecting supplies which David would drive down on Saturday. Their response was instantly positive and immense. Certainly the Lower and Mid Cape could do the same.

Terry Duenas, executive director of the Cape Cod Community Media Center, happily agreed to lend their lobby in Dennisport as a collection spot through close of business on Saturday. My father, Joseph P. Buckley, Jr., lent his home on Route 28 in West Chatham, as our main staging area. With all locations in place, and with the advice from friends in the New York City media and relief efforts, we created a list of most needed items for victims of Hurricane Sandy. On Friday afternoon we created an event on Facebook, with details of what we were doing and how Cape Codders could help.

Friends informed other friends, and local media picked up the story. RobinYoung was the first to deliver boxes of toiletries to my father’s house on Friday night. On Saturday morning, the Sosa family arrived at the Media Center offices with household cleaning supplies. More and more came throughout the day from residents from all over. Warm clothes from Brewster. Blankets from Barnstable. Food from Eastham. Water from Wellfleet.

Cape Cod relief supplies headed to Staten Island

“It very easily could have happened here on Cape Cod,” said Harwich’s Brad Willis. “It’s important that we help when we can, in hopes that others would help us if the need should ever arise.”And Cherylann Mott Dumas of Chatham donated because “we were without power for 2½ weeks last year, and no one came to our rescue.”

By the middle of Saturday afternoon, having checked back in Chatham, it was clear our small pickup would not be able to handle the load. Harwich’s Vana Pietroniro Trudeau saw the volume and offered with her husband, Guy, to find a cargo van and cover the cost of a rental. At the end of Saturday afternoon, we took two truckloads back to West Chatham, finding the same amount collected there. When the Trudeaus arrived with the rented van, a group of volunteers were joined by the news crew from WBZ-TV to help load. By 7 p.m., we were packed up.

Having worked tirelessly throughout Saturday to pack, sort and load supplies, my daughter Sofie woke at 5 a.m. on Sunday ready for the long drive. Sofie was excited by the over 200 cubic feet of various supplies we had collected so quickly. This only grew as we stopped by Southwest Airlines at T. F. Green Airport in Rhode Island. The airline donated five cases of water, which just barely fit into the back of the van.

Staten Island houses being guttedOnce we passed into New York, and especially over the Whitestone Bridge into Brooklyn, the traffic eased dramatically. The closer we got to the city, the fewer cars we saw. The lack of gas was definitely causing people to limit their driving. Sofie noticed a line of cars that stretched for blocks from a service station. “One man was putting the hose back, and he was smiling. But a police officer close by looked at the next person in line and shook his head.”

We crossed the Verrazano Narrows Bridge and took the first exit once on Staten Island. At our first intersection, the traffic light wasn’t working, but otherwise all seemed normal. We then headed to the lowest spot we could near the shore, and soon were confronted with the storm damage. Cars parked on the side of the road with sea weed on the wipers, flat tires, and dented hoods. Houses with missing windows, missing doors, missing walls. Sand everywhere. Full contractor bags lined the sidewalks. Some sidewalks were caved in, along with missing buildings. Men with power hoses attached to trucks washed down the streets.

Police directed traffic at every intersection, and we were able to pull over and ask where we should head. We found we were just one block from a spot. Once we pulled into this beach front parking lot at Midland Beach, we waited in line until a man in a blue jacket came up to us, “What are we doing?”

Unloading relief supplies on Staten Island

“Dropping off.”

He then directed us to a second line.Asecond man came up to us and asked what we had. Told that we had come all the way from Cape Cod, he made an exception. No more clothes were being accepted, but in this case, it would be easier to take it all than sorting through just for the supplies most needed.

After we pulled up to unload, we met Kevin. He asked what we had, and then the line formed. One volunteer pulled bags and boxes from the van, handed them to another volunteer waiting in line, and Kevin directed the volunteer with the bag where to take it. Sofie watched and took photos, excited by how many people were there to help. Joining in from the side door of the van, I passed supplies to another line of volunteers. The whole unloading took less than 10 minutes.

Once the truck was empty, we pulled into a parking space and looked to see where our things were headed. 

Volunteers line up to unload van from Cape Cod

Hundreds of people of all ages milled about the tables. Most seemed to be volunteers. Tables of hot food for residents were next to mobile phone charging stations. All free. Cases and cases of bottled water and a small field of shoes, piles of new stuffed animals and children’s books competed for space with piles of jeans and sweatshirts. The tables with the least amount of supplies were for cleaning products and baby goods. When we caught up with Kevin, we asked him what we should tell people they should send.

“Please, no more clothes.” He told us the biggest need was household products so people could get their houses together again. “And baby food. Diapers. Formula. It goes fast.”

He explained that when the seas came in and hit the houses, they came up to the second floor. The front of the houses didn’t look so bad now. But when ocean had come right in the front door and windows and washed everything out the back. Furniture and personal possessions were washed into the back yards and down the streets beyond. Many houses were so saturated that they would have to be condemned.

With a school day the next day for Sofie, the afternoon winding on, we told him we needed to get back on the road for our six-hour drive home. Kevin thanked us for our help, understanding that his seaside community and ours, although different in many respects, share some very basic characteristics. We are both under regular threat. “This time it was us. Next time, it could be you. Thank you for thinking of us.”

The Harwich Permanent Firefighters will be collecting items to be delivered to the Rockaway's / Staten Island Area. Collection will begin Tuesday November 6th and will continue through Saturday November 10th. Items should be dropped off at Harwich Fire Headquarters, 175 Sisson Road in Harwich by 6pm on Saturday.

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